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Calm-Water Resistance

  • Liang Yun
  • Alan Bliault
  • Huan Zong Rong
Chapter

Abstract

In Chap.  4 we reviewed the theory behind wave making by a hull as it moves through calm water, and the interactions between the demihulls of a catamaran. The theory is based on an incompressible inviscid fluid and applies to vessels in displacement mode. As mentioned there, the normal way to determine the total resistance for a hull form, and for catamarans, is via scale model testing and to use wave-making theory to enable us to extract that element from total resistance so as to make projections for small geometrical changes added back to the remainder generally referred to as residual drag.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Liang Yun
    • 1
  • Alan Bliault
    • 2
  • Huan Zong Rong
    • 1
  1. 1.Marine Design and Research Institute of ChinaShanghaiChina
  2. 2.Naval ArchitectSolaNorway

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