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Renal Structural Involvement in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: Cyst Growth and Total Kidney Volume – Lessons from the Consortium for Radiologic Imaging of Polycystic Kidney Disease (CRISP)

  • Frederic Rahbari-Oskoui
  • Harpreet Bhutani
  • Olubunmi Williams
  • Ankush Mittal
  • Arlene ChapmanEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by a relentless increase in cyst burden and kidney volume. Genotype, hypertension, and progression to ESRD are manifested directly through increases in total kidney volume (TKV). The annual % increase in TKV in the CRISP consortium participants is approximately 5% or 68 mls/year. Increased growth rates are associated with pain, hypertension, and gross hematuria. Both TKV and kidney length measured by magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound predict progression to CKD Stage 3 within 8 years with those with TKV >1047 mls, height-corrected TKV >600 mls/m, or kidney length >16 cm (ROC = 0.84–0.91) most likely to progress.

Keywords

Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Consortium for radiologic imaging in the study of polycystic kidney disease (CRISP) Total kidney volume (TKV) 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frederic Rahbari-Oskoui
    • 1
  • Harpreet Bhutani
    • 1
  • Olubunmi Williams
    • 1
  • Ankush Mittal
    • 1
  • Arlene Chapman
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of MedicineEmory University School of MedicineAtlantaUSA

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