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End-Stage Renal Disease in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

  • Ahd Al Khunaizi
  • Ahsan AlamEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) accounts for approximately 5–10% of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) cases and is the fourth leading cause for kidney failure worldwide. Half of patients with ADPKD reach ESRD by age 60 requiring the need for some form of renal replacement therapy. This chapter describes the changing incidence and prevalence of kidney dialysis and transplantation for patients with ADPKD and discusses the various issues around renal replacement therapy, focusing on aspects related to clinical management. The choice of dialysis modality, management of anemia and anticoagulation, hypertension, and ongoing renal and extrarenal complications of ADPKD are some potential concerns for those starting dialysis. Although hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis are both appropriate options, kidney transplantation remains the preferred choice if possible. Transplant-related issues for patients with ADPKD include the selection of living kidney donors from relatives, the risk of alloimmunization, the indication and timing for native nephrectomy, and the choice of immunosuppression. Overall, the outcomes of patients with ADPKD are favorable on dialysis and kidney transplantation compared to other patients reaching ESRD.

Keywords

Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease End-stage renal disease Hemodialysis Peritoneal dialysis Kidney transplantation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.McGill University Health CentreMontrealCanada
  2. 2.Division of Nephrology, Department of MedicineMcGill University Health Centre, Royal Victoria HospitalMontrealCanada

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