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Functional Symptoms in Pulmonology: Taking Your Breath Away

  • Ran D. AnbarEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Children with respiratory symptoms often are affected by a functional contribution to their presentation. In order to provide appropriate comprehensive care, clinicians need to identify and address these issues in such children. Some respiratory diagnoses are recognized generally to be of functional origin including functional dyspnea, habit cough, and vocal cord dysfunction. The criteria for establishing these diagnoses are discussed in the first section of this chapter. However, commonly unrecognized are the children with diagnosed physiologic disease such as asthma, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, or cystic fibrosis who develop additional or worsening symptoms due to emotional or psychosocial overlay. Whether triggered by physiological or psychological factors, symptoms may be identical, and thus clinicians may even be unaware of the psychological impact on a patient. The second section of this chapter will address how clinicians might recognize and offer optimal treatment for such patients.

Keywords

Anxiety Asthma Dyspnea Habit cough Vocal cord dysfunction 

Supplementary material

Video 4.1

Patient with Habit Cough Receiving Therapy with Hypnosis (WMV 67744 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PediatricsSUNY Upstate Medical University, Upstate Golisano Children’s HospitalSyracuseUSA

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