Advertisement

Language after Damage to the Immature Brain

  • Maureen Dennis
Chapter
Part of the Readings from the Encyclopedia of Neuroscience book series (REN)

Abstract

Many children fail to develop normal language for reasons not obviously due to anomalies of the brain. We are concerned here with the development of language in another group, children known to have sustained perturbations of brain structure and function—in utero, during infancy, or at some point in childhood.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Further reading

  1. Dennis M (1980): Strokes in childhood. I: Communicative intent, expression, and comprehension after left hemisphere arteriopathy in a right-handed nine-year-old. In: Language Development and Aphasia in Children, Rieber R, ed. New York: Academic PressGoogle Scholar
  2. Dennis M (1983): Syntax in brain-injured children. In: Psychobiology of Language, Sluddert-Kennedy M, ed. Cambridge: MIT PressGoogle Scholar
  3. Kirk U, ed (1983): Neuropsychology of Language, Reading, and Spelling. New York: Academic PressGoogle Scholar
  4. Satz P, Bullard-Bates C (1981): Acquired aphasia in children. In: Acquired Aphasia, Sarno MT, ed. New York: Academic PressGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maureen Dennis

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations