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Practical Aspects of Fracture Mechanics for Steam Turbine Rotors

  • T. P. Sherlock
Part of the Sagamore Army Materials Research Conference Proceedings book series (SAMC)

Abstract

Various aspects of the use of a fracture mechanics approach to steam turbine rotor design are covered in this chapter. The importance of using proper operational procedure to prevent brittle fracture is reviewed, and various methods of estimating toughness properties from small amounts of material are discussed. Some practical aspects of disc bursting are covered, and a probabilistic approach to design is introduced by way of an example problem.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. P. Sherlock
    • 1
  1. 1.Westinghouse Electric CorporationLesterUSA

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