Advertisement

Synthetic Polymers in the Medical Sciences

  • H. F. Mark

Abstract

By far the most widespread and important use of synthetic organic polymers was stimulated by their attractive mechanical, thermal, electrical and optical properties. They invaded, and now dominate, the large and important industries which produce textiles, packaging materials, plastics, rubbers, electronic devices, coatings, adhesives and medical appliances and many thousand scientists are now engaged in stabilizing and upgrading the performance of synthetic polymers in connection with their application in these fields.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    R. Brill. Liebigs Ann. 434, 204 (1923),; cf. also K. H. Meyer and H. Mark. Aufbau Akad. Verlag, Leipzig (1930).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    W. T. Astbury et al.Proc. Roy. Soc. A150, 533 (1935).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    W. T. Astbury et al.Proc. Roy. Soc. B129, 307 (1940).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    cf. L. Pauling and R. B. Corey. J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 72, 5349 (1950);CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 4a.
    L. Pauling and R. B. Corey. Proc. Roy. Soc. B141, 21 (1953).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 5.
    M. F. Perutz. Nature, Lond. 167, 1053 (1967).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 6.
    cf. G. H. Bamford, H. Elliott, and W. E. Hanby. Synthetic Polypeptides, Academic Press, New York (1960).Google Scholar
  8. 7.
    I. D. Bath and J. W. Ellis. J. Phys. Chem. 45, 204 (1941).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 8.
    E.J. Ambrose and W. E. Hanby. Nature, Lond. 165, 921 (1949).Google Scholar
  10. 9.
    E. R. Blout et al. J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 76, 4492 (1954),;CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 9.
    P. M. Doty et al.J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 76, 4493 (1954).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 10.
    cf. M. Goodman and J. S. Schulman. J. Polymer Sci. G12, 23 (1966).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 11.
    M. Goodman and E. E. Schmitt. J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 81, 5507 (1959).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 12.
    W. Moffit. J. Chem. Phys. 25, 467 (1956).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 13.
    E. R. Blout et al. J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 83, 4766 (1961),;CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 13.
    E. R. Blout et al.J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 84, 3193 (1962).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 14.
    cf., e.g., M. Goodman. J. Polymer Sci., G12, 23 (1966).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 15.
    B. K. Zinner and J. K. Bragg. J. Chem. Phys. 28, 1246 (1958),;CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 15a.
    B. K. Zinner and J. K. Bragg. J. Chem. Phys. 31, 526 (1959.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 15b.
    J. H. Gibbs and E. A. DiMarzio. J. Chem. Phys. 28, 1247 (1958),;CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 15c.
    J. H. Gibbs and E. A. DiMarzio. J. Chem. Phys. 30, 271 (1959.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 15d.
    S. Lifson and A. Roig. J. Chem. Phys. 34, 1963 (1961).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 16.
    cf. G. G. Overberger et al. I.U.P.A.G. lecture, Tokyo, Sept., 1966.Google Scholar
  24. 17.
    C. G. Overberger et al. J. Polymer Sci. 27, 381 (1958),;CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. 17a.
    C. G. Overberger J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 80, 5431 (1958).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. 18.
    G. G. Overberger et al. J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 85, 3513 (1963),;CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 18a.
    G. G. Overberger et al.J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 87, 296, 4310 (1965)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. 19.
    H. Morawetz et al.Polymer Letters 4, 409 (1966).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 20.
    H. Morawetz and J. A. Shafer. Biopolymers 1, 71 (1963).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. 21.
    cf., e.g., E. Katchalsky et al. Nature, Lond. 169, 1095 (1952),;CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. 21a.
    cf., e.g., E. Katchalsky et al. Nature, Lond. 176, 118 (1955),;CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. 21b.
    cf., e.g., E. Katchalsky et al. Science 123, 1129 (1956).Google Scholar
  33. 22.
    A large group of prominent experts has been active in this field for many years under the auspices of the U.S. Government at the N.LH. in Bethesda, Md. and at the N.B.S. in Gaithersburg. cf., e.g., F. Leonard. Army Res. Dev. Mag. March, 1966, p. 21. Also F. Leonard. ASTM Monograph 386, Introduction (1964).Google Scholar
  34. 23.
    R. I. Leininger. ASTM Monograph 386, 71 (1964),;Google Scholar
  35. 23a.
    S. M. Atlas and H. Mark. ASTM Monograph 386, 63 (1964).Google Scholar
  36. 24.
    C. S. Woodward. ASTM Monograph 386, 77 (1964). i cf. also the interesting work of O. Wichterle on hydrophilic gels.Google Scholar
  37. 25.
    cf., e.g., R. L. Bowen. J. Amer. Dent. Assoc. 64, 378 (1962),;Google Scholar
  38. 25a.
    cf., e.g., R. L. Bowen. J. Amer. Dent. Assoc. 66, 57 (1963),;Google Scholar
  39. 25b.
    cf., e.g., R. L. Bowen. J. Amer. Dent. Assoc. 69, 481 (1964), and J. Dent. Res. 44, 690, 895, 903, 906 1965.Google Scholar
  40. 25c.
    J. M. Brauer. J. Amer. Dent. Assoc. 72, 1151 (1966).Google Scholar
  41. 26.
    F. Leonard et al.Arch. Surg. 94, 187 (1967).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. F. Mark
    • 1
  1. 1.Polytechnic Institute of BrooklynNew YorkUSA

Personalised recommendations