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Piston and Cylinder Apparatus for Pressures Up to 100 Kilobars

  • C. C. Bradley
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter a description is given of a number of devices with the same design specifications as the cubic and tetrahedral anvil apparatus, that is, pressures and temperatures up to 100 kb and 2,000°C in volumes of the order of several cm3. These include conventional piston and cylinder apparatus using solid pressure-transmitting media but in all other respects similar in design to the hydrostatic apparatus described in Chapter 3 and the ‘belt’ and ‘girdle’ devices which are not strictly speaking piston and cylinder types, but since the pressure regions usually have cylindrical symmetry they have been included in this chapter. The generation of pressure is different in the two cases. In the first it is straightforward force over area in a rigid system, in the second the compressible gasket method is used. The apparatus is simpler than the cubic and tetrahedral anvil types in many respects but the construction of the sample cells and gaskets is more complicated.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1969

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  • C. C. Bradley

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