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Dimensional Approaches to Diagnosis and the Problem of Anxiety and Depression

  • Karla Moras
  • David H. Barlow
Chapter
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

For any field of scientific investigation to advance, a consensually agreed upon way to classify the phenomena of interest is required. In the United States, the prevailing way to classify the problems that bring people to mental health professionals is the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 3rd edition, revised (DSM-III-R, American Psychiatric Association, 1987). The DSM-III-R is primarily a categorical system, although it has dimensional components (e.g., the Axis V ratings of level of adaptive functioning). In a categorical nosology, sets of criteria are used to determine which diagnostic category best fits a person’s presenting problems. Categorical nosologies assume discontinuity and qualitative differences between categories.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karla Moras
    • 1
  • David H. Barlow
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Stress and Anxiety DisordersThe State University of New York at AlbanyAlbanyUSA

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