Post-Traumatic Therapy

  • Frank M. Ochberg
Part of the The Springer Series on Stress and Coping book series (SSSO)

Abstract

Most victims of violence never seek professional therapy to deal with the emotional impact of traumatic events. If they did, they would be sorely disappointed. There are not enough therapists in the world to treat the millions of men, women, and children who have been assaulted, abused, and violated as a result of war, tyranny, crime, disaster, and family violence. When people do seek help, suffering with post-traumatic symptoms, they may find therapists who are ill-equipped to provide assistance. The credentialed clinicians in psychiatry, psychology, nursing, social work, and allied professions are only recently learning to catalogue, evaluate, and refine a therapeutic armamentarium to serve traumatized clients. There are, however, a cadre of clinicians who have shared insights and approaches, face-to-face and through written works, defining principles and techniques that address the worldwide problem of post-traumatic readjustment. A recent sampling of clinical insights (Ochberg, 1988) attempts to define the commonalities in assumptions and approaches to therapy. The common ground is the foundation of Post-Traumatic Therapy (PTT). The individual distinctions separating clinicians who share this common ground are the inevitable differences of creative minds.

Keywords

Traumatic Event Personality Disorder Family Therapy Violent Crime Crime Victim 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frank M. Ochberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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