The Oculomotor System

  • Angelo Buizza

Abstract

In many vertebrates, in particular man and primates, an important part, maybe most, of the information coming from the environment is collected and processed by vision. Then, these animals have developed both sophisticated visual systems and effective Eye Movement, or OculoMotor, Systems (OMS). Both in higher and lower animals, the main role of eye movement (EM) is to serve vision and ensure optimal conditions for it. Then EMs may be different in different animals, depending on the particular features and needs of the animal’s visual system.

Keywords

Head Movement Semicircular Canal Smooth Pursuit Vestibular Nucleus Head Rotation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Angelo Buizza
    • 1
  1. 1.Dipartimento di Informatica e SistemisticaUniversità di PaviaPaviaItaly

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