The Properties and Chemistry of Resorcinol

  • Hans Dressler
Part of the Topics in Applied Chemistry book series (TAPP)

Abstract

Other names which have been used are 1,3-benzenediol, resorcin, m-dihydroxybenzene, 1,3-dihydroxybenzene, and 1,3-dioxybenzene. The conventional numbering of the carbon atoms of resorcinol is shown inside structure 2–1. The alpha (α), beta (β), gamma (γ) designation was used in the older literature and is still used occasionally today.

Keywords

United States Pharmacopeia Disulfonic Acid Threshold Limit Value Tungstophosphoric Acid Sumitomo Chemical 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hans Dressler
    • 1
  1. 1.Formerly of INDSPEC Chemical CorporationPittsburghUSA

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