Self-Attitudes and Antisocial Personality as Moderators of the Drug Use-Violence Relationship

  • Howard B. Kaplan
  • Kelly R. Damphousse
Part of the Longitudinal Research in the Social and Behavioral Sciences book series (LRSB)

Abstract

This chapter reports a series of logistic regression models that examine the effect of drug use on violence and the conditions under which the effect on later violence of drug use during adolescence (net of the effect of earlier violence, non-drug/nonviolent deviance, and sociodemographic controls) is relatively strong or weak. We first examine the literature that describes the general consequences of drug use, the putative causal relationship between drugs and crime, and violence as a consequence of drug use. We then introduce the possibility that two variables (self-derogation and antisocial personality) may moderate the drug use-violence relationship and account for apparently contradictory findings regarding this relationship that are reported in the literature.

Keywords

Criminal Activity Violent Crime Violent Behavior Deviant Behavior Sage Publication 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Howard B. Kaplan
    • 1
  • Kelly R. Damphousse
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SociologyTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA

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