Abstract

There are many inpatient settings today that treat children and adolescents in accordance with psychoanalytic principles. These range from traditional residential treatment centers in rural or urban settings to small units in the midst of large psychiatric or medical institutions. To illustrate one psychoanalytic approach, I will describe the treatment at Sunrise Hall, an 11-bed coed unit for teenagers 14 to 18 years of age, that is part of the 69-bed Children’s Hospital at Menninger in Topeka, Kansas. This psychoanalytic hospital treatment reflects my own professional synthesis, which has emerged from my work as director of this unit.

Keywords

Staff Member Family Therapy Emotional Exhaustion Hospital Treatment Borderline Personality Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ira Stamm
    • 1
  1. 1.The Menninger ClinicTopekaUSA

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