Partners in Care

Involving Parents in Children’s Residential Treatment
  • Jeffrey M. Jenson
  • James K. Whittaker

Abstract

Residential treatment programs for children and youths have historically concentrated on the child in placement, with little regard for the parents’ ability to assist in the treatment or community reentry process (Laird, 1979; Letulle, 1979). Traditionally, when out-of-home placement became necessary, interventions in child welfare focused on the removal of the child from his or her family and subsequent placement in a residential facility. For a variety of reasons, parents received little assistance or encouragement from residential agencies to become actively involved in their child’s treatment program (Whittaker, 1979).

Keywords

Child Welfare Foster Care Residential Care Residential Treatment Parent Training 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffrey M. Jenson
    • 1
  • James K. Whittaker
    • 2
  1. 1.Graduate School of Social WorkUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA
  2. 2.School of Social WorkUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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