Observational Methods for Assessing Psychological State

  • Daniel L. Tennenbaum
  • Theodore Jacob
Part of the The Springer Series in Behavioral Psychophysiology and Medicine book series (SSBP)

Abstract

Interest in the emotional responding of subjects has a well-established and important role in many sectors of the behavioral and biological sciences. As such, methods for describing the current psychological state of subjects need to be given careful attention. Investigators have become increasingly aware of problems associated with requesting immediate self-reports from subjects regarding their emotional state. An important and potentially effective alternative to self-report approaches is to gather data on emotional state through observational procedures. The purpose of this chapter is to review some of the better alternatives available for conducting such assessments both with individual subjects and during dyadic interactions.

Keywords

Emotional State Emotional Expression Code System Dyadic Interaction Physiological Assessment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel L. Tennenbaum
    • 1
  • Theodore Jacob
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyKent State UniversityKentUSA
  2. 2.Division of Family StudiesUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA

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