Ethnic Differences in Resting and Stress-Induced Cardiovascular and Humoral Activity

An Overview
  • Norman B. Anderson
Part of the The Springer Series in Behavioral Psychophysiology and Medicine book series (SSBP)

Abstract

America’s major ethnic groups—blacks, Asian Americans, Hispanics, and Native Americans— now constitute approximately 20% of the U.S. population. According to the most recent census information (Bureau of the Census, 1983), blacks represented 11.5%, Hispanics 6.4%, Asians 1.5%, and Native Americans 0.6% of the population in 1980. The recently released Report of the Secretary’s Task Force on Black and Minority Health (1985) contains the most comprehensive summary to date on the chief contributors to mortality and morbidity among these ethnic groups. As for whites in the United States, cardiovascular diseases are among the primary causes of death in diseases between the majority population and many minority groups. In many cases, ethnic groups suffer disproportionately higher rates of cardiovascular disease.

Keywords

Racial Difference Mental Arithmetic White Child Cold Pressor Test Parental History 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norman B. Anderson
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryDuke University Medical SchoolDurhamUSA
  2. 2.Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical CenterVeterans Administration Medical CenterDurhamUSA

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