Overview of Psychodynamic Treatment

  • Paul Crits-Christoph
  • Lester Luborsky
  • Jacques Barber

Abstract

Dynamic psychotherapies continue to be the most commonly used mode of treatment both in outpatient psychiatric clinics and in private practice (Feldman, Lorr, & Russell, 1958; Henry, Sims, & Spray, 1973). They are the major form of psychotherapy taught in psychiatric residency programs. Among clinical psychologists, a survey by Prochaska and Norcross (1983) showed that 29.2% identified themselves as purely psychodynamic in orientation, and 45% of those who labeled themselves eclectic (30% of the total sample) described dynamic psychotherapy as underlying their eclectic orientations. When compared to surveys conducted during the 1970s (e.g., Garfield & Kurtz, 1976), these figures actually represent an increased interest in dynamic psychotherapy since that time.

Keywords

Therapeutic Relationship Major Technique Standard Edition Life Script Dynamic Therapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Crits-Christoph
    • 1
  • Lester Luborsky
    • 1
  • Jacques Barber
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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