Metabolism Through Alcohol Dehydrogenase is Not a Prerequisite for Fatty Liver Induction by Alcohols

  • R. Nordmann
  • F. Beaugé
  • M. Clément
  • J. Nordmann

Abstract

It is well known that the most common manifestation of alcohol hepatotoxicty is the occurrence of a fatty liver, that is to say, an increase in the hepatic triacylglycerol level. Such an increase can be reproduced experimentally even by a single ethanol administration. It is still subject to debate whether the fatty liver induced by such administration is due to ethanol metabolism, resulting in an enhanced production of reducing equivalents in the hepatocyte and thereby inhibiting fatty acid oxidation. However other experimental data, such as those of Kalant, Khanna, Seymour, and Loth (1975), have brought arguments in favor of the role of ethanol per se, acting through an unspecific stress action, independent from ethanol metabolism.

Keywords

Fatty Liver Fatty Acid Oxidation Ethanol Metabolism Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Oxidation NADH Ratio 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Nordmann
    • 1
  • F. Beaugé
    • 1
  • M. Clément
    • 1
  • J. Nordmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Service de Biochimie de la Faculté de Médecinede Paris-Ouest et Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) U 72Paris Cedex 06France

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