State-of-the-Art Programming in Massachusetts: A Brief Description of the May Institute

  • Stephen C. Luce
  • Walter P. Christian

Abstract

The May Institute is a private, non-profit human service agency serving persons with autism and other severe developmental disabilities. The Institute began as the parents’ School for Atypical Children in 1955 and was founded by Dr. and Mrs. Jacques M. May as a center dedicated to the understanding and rehabilitation of autism. Dr. May, who was famous as a physician, author, and researcher with the World Health Organization, established the program in the town of Chatham about 145 km. from Boston on scenic Cape Cod in Massachusetts. Having fathered twin autistic sons, Dr. May was interested in establishing a treatment center focusing on study of the autistic child which contrasted to the treatment of the day which was parent-centered. The Mays found such an approach which linked autism to parental personality traits, counter productive.

Keywords

Autistic Child Restrictive Setting Apply Behavior Analysis Autistic Behavior Service Continuum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen C. Luce
  • Walter P. Christian

There are no affiliations available

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