Metallization of Plastics with Resistance Heated Sources

  • Kevin M. Anetsberger

Abstract

Since the advent of the use of resistance heated sources for the metallization of plastic substrates in the 1940’s, both the sources and the process have become increasingly sophisticated. Evaporative sources have evolved from single strand to multiple strand wires, then to coil and basket forms. Resistance heated crucibles and boats were developed for more difficult evaporative materials. The use of intermetallics made possible the coating of plastic films.

Keywords

Plastic Part Plastic Substrate Titanium Diboride Cellulose Acetate Butyrate Silicon Monoxide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kevin M. Anetsberger
    • 1
  1. 1.Midwest Tungsten Service, Inc.Burr RidgeUSA

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