Effect of Plasma Treatment and Ion-Plating on Adhesion of Metallized Polyimide and Poly(ethylene terephthalate)

  • Katsuhiko Nakamae
  • Satoshi Tanigawa
  • Tsunetaka Matsumoto

Abstract

The adhesion of thin metal films on polymeric substrates is a very important factor in any application of metallized plastics. The effect of plastic surface treatment by O2 plasma and R.F. ion-plating on adhesion was investigated. Polyimide [PI] and poly(ethylene terephthalate) [PET] were used. The following results were obtained: 1) When the polymeric surface was pretreated with high power O2 plasma (the radio frequency (R.F.) power: 100W), the peel strength at the Fe/PI interface abruptly increased with increase in the treatment time. When it was pretreated with lower power O2 plasma (the R.F. power: 15W), its peel strength increased at earlier treatment time and then kept constant. ESCA spectra of the polymeric surface treated with O2 plasma were analyzed, and the surface density of functional groups on the polymeric surface was determined. The production of the functional groups and their surface density were correlated with the adhesion of thin metal films on polymeric substrate. 2) When the ion-plating technique was used to metallize plastics, the peel strength at the polymer/metal interface increased with increase in the R.F. power and the accelerating voltage. The deposited metal formed chemical bonding with the polymeric substrate through oxygen atoms at the interface as shown by ESCA or FT-IR results.

Keywords

Contact Angle Plasma Treatment Polymeric Surface Polymeric Substrate Ethylene Terephthalate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katsuhiko Nakamae
    • 1
  • Satoshi Tanigawa
    • 1
  • Tsunetaka Matsumoto
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Industrial ChemistryFaculty of Engineering Kobe UniversityRokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657Japan

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