Imagery pp 105-119 | Cite as

Use of Imagery in Grief Therapy

  • Mary S. Cerney

Abstract

Loss and its companion, grief, are life’s inseparable pair. To grow and move forward, we must let go of the past and accept the resulting pain of loss. This process begins at our birth and does not end until our death. Denying loss may temporarily ease the pain, but not its effect. Such pain continues its impact on life until it is faced and integrated into one’s total personality.

Keywords

Grieve Process Unfinished Business Grief Process Mourning Process Funeral Service 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary S. Cerney
    • 1
  1. 1.C. F. Menninger Memorial HospitalUSA

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