Urolithiasis pp 903-909 | Cite as

Intracorporeal Laser-Induced Shock-Wave Lithotripsy

  • R. Hofmann
  • R. Hartung
  • H. Schmidt-Kloiber
  • E. Reichel

Abstract

Extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has introduced a tremendous change in the management of patients with urinary stones. Patient morbidity has decreased as compared to other methods of stone removal, and only 10–25% of all patients need subsequent stone-particle manipulation by secondary percutaneous or transurethral methods. Impacted or very hard calculi in the ureter, especially when they are not surrounded by fluid, can only be crushed in about 40–50% of cases in situ, while the rest of the stone material has to be flushed up to the kidney and be disintegrated there. This procedure has to be done with small catheters or an endoscope since direct access to the stone is mandatory. Thus, there is still need for ureteroscopic manipulation.

Keywords

Shock Wave Laser Energy Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy Ureteral Stone Ureteral Calculus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Hofmann
    • 1
  • R. Hartung
    • 1
  • H. Schmidt-Kloiber
    • 2
  • E. Reichel
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Urology, Klinikum rects der IsarTechnische Universität MünchenGermany
  2. 2.Department of Experimental PhysicsKarl-Franzens-UniversitätGrazGermany

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