Urolithiasis pp 885-891 | Cite as

What Happens to a Stone with Lithotripsy?

  • J. P. Whelan
  • M. E. Nasr
  • R. C. Newman
  • B. Finlayson

Abstract

What happens to a stone with extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is common knowledge at one level of understanding (Fig. 1). Either the stone breaks up or it doesn’t. If there is a break-up, either fragments completely pass or they don’t. If fragments pass, then there is a good chance that some of them will be sent for analysis. If an analysis is obtained, there is a chance the patient will receive some specific stoneprophylactic therapy that will reduce but not eliminate the possibility of further stone growth. If the stone fails to break up or parts of it fail to pass, then there is a good likelihood that continued stone growth will occur. The degree of this likelihood is not known but seems to be less than expected. While there may be some disagreement about various probabilities and likelihoods, this general scheme is non-controversial and is nothing more than common sense.

Keywords

Shock Wave Lithium Niobate Cavitation Bubble Energy Capture Stone Growth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    M Nasr, “The Evolution and Dynamics of Spark Generated Shock Waves and Their Focusing by Ellipsoidal Relectors”, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Florida (1986).Google Scholar
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    H Kaleko, H Watanabe, T Takahashi, K Watanabe, K Akiyama, and K Kondo, Studies on the application of micro-explosion to medicine and biology, in: “IV. Strength of Wet and Dry Urinary Calculi”, Nippon Hinyokika Gakkai Zasshi 70:61 (1979).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    JP Whelan and B Finlayson, An experimental model for the systemic investigation of stone fracture by ESWL, J. Urol. In press (1989).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    JP Whelan and B Finlayson, Use of a retrograde lavage catheter during ESWL treatments, Urology, in press (1989).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. P. Whelan
    • 1
  • M. E. Nasr
    • 2
  • R. C. Newman
    • 3
  • B. Finlayson
    • 3
  1. 1.HamiltonCanada
  2. 2.Cairo UniversityCairoEgypt
  3. 3.University of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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