Health Behavior Research

Present and Future
  • David S. Gochman

Abstract

This chapter begins with an overview of some conceptual advances that characterize the emergence of contemporary, late 1980s-early 1990s, health behavior research. It continues with a discussion of issues related to health behavior’s identity, and describes an agenda for future research, including meta issues, substantive areas for research, and searching for meaning. A summary concludes the chapter.

Keywords

Health Behavior Behavioral Medicine Health Belief Health Belief Model Preventive Behavior 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • David S. Gochman
    • 1
  1. 1.Raymond A. Kent School of Social WorkUniversity of LouisvilleLouisvilleUSA

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