On The Role of Motor Cortex in the Learned Rearrangement of Postural Coordinations

  • M. E. Ioffe
  • N. G. Ivanova
  • A. A. Frolov
  • E. V. Birjukova
  • N. V. Kiseljova

Summary

Two kinds of postural patterns opposite to inborn ones were elaborated in dogs. Some dogs were trained to avoid electrical stimulation of left forelimb by lifting the limb and keeping it lifted for 5s. This reaction had to be accompanied by decreasing the pressure on the support of the ipsilateral hindlimb, so the inborn “diagonal” postural pattern (unloading the limb diagonally opposite to the lifted one and loading the other pair of limbs) was rearranged into the “ipsilateral” one. The other dogs were trained to escape electrical stimulation of one forelimb by increasing the support pressure of the limb (this reaction is opposite to the inborn flexor reflex). Ablation of the motor cortex contralateral to the performing limb resulted in temporary disturbances of the rearranged postural patterns. After bilateral ablation of the motor cortex the elaborated postural patterns disappeared and mainly inborn postural coordinations were performed. The program of the elaborated reaction was maintained and mainly the executive mechanisms were disturbed (inhibition of the inborn reactions). The motor cortex probably controls the rearrangement of postural coordinations modulating functions of the appropriate brain stem structures.

Keywords

Motor Cortex Support Pressure Postural Adjustment Successful Reaction Postural Pattern 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. E. Ioffe
    • 1
  • N. G. Ivanova
    • 1
  • A. A. Frolov
    • 1
  • E. V. Birjukova
    • 1
  • N. V. Kiseljova
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Higher Nervous Activity and NeurophysiologyUSSR Academy of SciencesMoscowUSSR

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