Contact and Cooperation

When Do They Work?
  • Marilynn B. Brewer
  • Norman Miller
Part of the Perspectives in Social Psychology book series (PSPS)

Abstract

Although the social-science-based justification for the Brown decision of 1954 was framed primarily in terms of its effect on the achievement and self-esteem of minority children, it is generally agreed that a major societal goal of desegregation is improved intergroup relations (Stephan, 1978). Presumably, what we mean by this is not simply that we can create conditions in which members of different ethnic groups coexist temporarily without conflict. What most of us have in mind when we think of improving intergroup relations is that any positive effects of contact will extend beyond the contact situation to reduce intergroup conflict and prejudice in general.

Keywords

Cooperative Learning Category Membership Category Member Category Identity Intergroup Relation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marilynn B. Brewer
    • 1
  • Norman Miller
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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