Influence of Muscle Afferents and Mechanoreceptor Cutaneous Inputs on Alpha Motor Neurons at Rest and During Voluntary Contraction

  • Manik Shahani
  • O. C. J. Lippold
  • K. Darton
  • U. Shahani
  • R. Sangeeta
  • P. G. Patel
  • Kalpana Sekhar
  • D. H. Dastoor

Abstract

Many studies have established a relationship between muscle afferent inputs or cutaneous inputs separately, and the excitability of alpha motor neurons. However, in normal physiological situations, more often these inputs coming from muscle spindles of agonist, antagonist or synergistic muscles operate simultaneously with mechanoreceptor inputs from the skin; besides, the behavior of the alpha motor neurons when they are being driven by supraspinal influences and otherwise, in the context of peripheral inputs, becomes of greater importance in terms of functional significance. In order to study this complex phenomenon, several experiments have been designed which may help in the better understanding of the physiology of alpha motor neurons during voluntary movements as well as in reflex activities.

Keywords

Index Finger Median Nerve Isometric Contraction Sural Nerve Femoral Nerve 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Manik Shahani
    • 2
  • O. C. J. Lippold
    • 1
  • K. Darton
    • 1
  • U. Shahani
    • 1
  • R. Sangeeta
    • 2
  • P. G. Patel
    • 2
  • Kalpana Sekhar
    • 2
  • D. H. Dastoor
    • 2
  1. 1.University College LondonLondonEngland
  2. 2.E.C.I. Institute of Electrophysiology for Fundamental and Applied ResearchBombayIndia

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