Noble Death, Rational Suicide, or Self-Determination

  • George P. SmithII

Abstract

The first performance of Brian Clark’s play, Whose Life Is It Anyway, was transmitted on March 12, 1972, by Granada television in England. It was performed subsequently on the London stage in 1978 and in New York in 1979 and made a motion picture in 1981.

Keywords

Rational Suicide Criminal Liability Durable Power Passive Euthanasia Irreversible Cessation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.
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  2. 2.
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    Id. at § 7188.5.Google Scholar
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    Id. at § 7189(a).Google Scholar
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    Id. at § 7189(b), § 7195.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • George P. SmithII
    • 1
  1. 1.The Catholic University of America School of LawUSA

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