Introduction to Diagnosis and Assessment of Autism

  • Eric Schopler
  • Gary B. Mesibov
Part of the Current Issues in Autism book series (CIAM)

Abstract

With our superabundance of tests, scales, and questionnaires evaluating and reducing to numbers our performance in every sphere of life from school and work to sex, evaluation has come under attack in many quarters. On the other hand, our 20+ years of experience in the Treatment and Education of Autistic and related Communication handicapped CHildren (TEACCH) program has taught us that careful and appropriate evaluation can be crucial components of our intervention programs for autistic youngsters and their families. We therefore considered it especially important and worthwhile to devote our sixth volume in this series on autism to diagnosis and assessment and to distinguish some common misunderstandings and misuses of diagnosis and assessment from valid and needed evaluation, especially with such complex disorders as autism.

Keywords

Autistic Child Group Home Childhood Autism Rate Scale Infantile Autism Informal Assessment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric Schopler
    • 1
  • Gary B. Mesibov
    • 1
  1. 1.Division TEACCHThe University of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA

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