Defects and Impurities in SiO2 Interface for Oxides Prepared Using Superclean Methods

  • Tadahiro Ohmi
  • Mizuho Morita
  • Takeo Hattori

Abstract

A superclean oxidation technology characterized by hydrogen and nitrogen contamination-free oxidation has been developed. It was experimentally demonstrated that an Si-SiO2 interface with a high energy barrier height of 3.5 eV for electron emission from Si into SiO2 could be realized. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis revealed that the valence-band discontinuity of the SiSiO2 interface is 4.5 eV which is smaller than that of the conventional oxide. These results suggest that the direct tunneling and Fowler-Nordheim tunneling current densities through the oxide can be controlled by interface doping for requirements of each target device oxide such as gate oxide, DRAM storage capacitor oxide, E2 PROM oxide, etc.

Keywords

Gate Oxide Breakdown Strength Direct Tunneling Interface Trap Density Average Electric Field 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tadahiro Ohmi
    • 1
  • Mizuho Morita
    • 1
  • Takeo Hattori
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of ElectronicsTohoku UniversitySendai 980Japan
  2. 2.Department of Electrical and Electronic EngineeringMusashi Institute of TechnologySetagaya-ku, Tokyo 158Japan

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