Epidemiology of Suicide in the United States

  • John L. McIntosh

Abstract

An American dies by his or her own hand on the average of every 17 minutes (1986, data calculated from figures in National Center for Health Statistics [NCHS]; 1988a) or approximately 85 self-inflicted deaths per day. The more than 30,000 suicides in 1986 (30,904) represent a rate of 12.8 per 100,000 population. In other words, if a representative sample of 100,000 Americans had been chosen on January 1 of 1986 and followed through the year, by the end of the day on December 31 about 12 or 13 would have died by suicide. This number of deaths places suicide currently as the eighth leading cause of death in the United States. The present chapter will focus on the epidemiological factors associated with these 30,000 annual suicide deaths.

Keywords

Suicidal Behavior Suicide Rate Suicide Risk Suicide Prevention Male Suicide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • John L. McIntosh
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyIndiana University at South BendSouth BendUSA

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