Neuropathology and Neuropsychology of Behavioral Disturbances following Traumatic Brain Injury

  • Robert L. Mapou
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

The nature of traumatic brain injury (TBI) determines many of the neuropathological features with high predictability. The neuropathological sequelae directly influence the cognitive deficits which occur. These, in turn, impact upon the types of behavioral disturbances associated with TBI. Such disturbances can be distinguished from those seen in other behaviorally disturbed individuals, including those who are developmentally disabled, focally injured, or progressively demented.

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Executive Function Executive Functioning Behavioral Disturbance Behavioral Difficulty 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert L. Mapou
    • 1
  1. 1.HIV Behavioral Medicine Research ProgramHenry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military MedicineRockvilleUSA

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