Reproductive Tract Infections: Challenges for International Health Policy, Programs, and Research

  • Judith N. Wasserheit
  • King K. Holmes
Part of the Reproductive Biology book series (RBIO)

Abstract

In resource-poor settings around the world, reproductive tract infections (RTIs) are extremely common, and the consequences for the health and social well-being of women and their children are frequent and potentially devastating.1,2 RTIs include three types of infection: sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), such as chlamydial infection, gonorrhea, trichomoniasis, syphilis, chancroid, genital herpes, genital warts, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection; endogenous infections, which are caused by overgrowth of organisms that can be present in the genital tract of healthy women, such as bacterial vaginosis and vulvovaginal candidiasis; and iatrogenic infections, which are associated with medical procedures. All these infections are preventable or treatable causes of infertility, ectopic pregnancy, cervical cancer, fetal wastage, low birth weight, infant blindness, neonatal pneumonia, and mental retardation.3,4 In addition, they facilitate transmission of HIV.5,6 Because of sociocultural factors and structural barriers to care, both the incidence and the impact of RTI sequelae are likely to be particularly great in the Third World.

Keywords

Cervical Cancer Family Planning Ectopic Pregnancy Bacterial Vaginosis Genital Herpes 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Judith N. Wasserheit
    • 1
  • King K. Holmes
    • 2
  1. 1.Sexually Transmitted Diseases Branch National Institute of Allergy and Infectious DiseasesNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Center for AIDS and STDsUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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