Reproductive Tract Infections in Kenya: Insights for Action from Research

  • A. B. N. Maggwa
  • E. N. Ngugi
Part of the Reproductive Biology book series (RBIO)

Abstract

Reproductive tract infections (RTIs) include not only sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), but also endogenous infections, caused by an overgrowth of organisms normally present in the reproductive tract, and iatrogenic infections, caused by procedures that manipulate the reproductive tract, including induced abortion, delivery, and traditional practices. Although data are inadequate and are drawn primarily from clinic and hospital populations, it appears that RTIs are common and have severe consequences for women in Kenya. Nonetheless, national health planning and policies have given little priority to these diseases. This chapter explores the reasons for this neglect and attempts to offer a range of possible interventions.

Keywords

Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Genital Tract Chlamydia Trachomatis Truck Driver 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. B. N. Maggwa
    • 1
  • E. N. Ngugi
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyCollege of Health Sciences University of NairobiNairobiKenya
  2. 2.Department of Community HealthCollege of Health Sciences University of NairobiNairobiKenya

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