Psychotherapy Research

Issues to Consider in Planning a Study
  • Jacques P. Barber
  • Lester B. Luborsky
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

Our aim in this chapter is to provide a guide to issues that need to be addressed during the planning of psychotherapy research. Our strategy is to explain the research issues first and then to exemplify them with actual studies of three major therapeutic systems: cognitive therapy, dynamic therapy, and interpersonal psychotherapy. These three systems were chosen because they each are well described and are the focus of much current research activity. Others that might have been selected as examples include: the behavioral, the client-centered, the Gestalt, the family therapy, and the eclectic systems.

Keywords

Cognitive Therapy Therapeutic Alliance Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory Interpersonal Psychotherapy Clinician Rating Scale 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jacques P. Barber
    • 1
  • Lester B. Luborsky
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Psychotherapy Research, Department of PsychiatryUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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