Childhood

  • Morris J. Cohen
  • Walter B. Branch
  • W. Grant Willis
  • Lisa L. Weyandt
  • George W. Hynd
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

Childhood neuropsychological assessment can be distinguished from adult neuropsychological assessment by the marked discontinuities that characterize human development (see Fletcher & Taylor, 1984). Many inaccurate assumptions have been made about brain-behavior relationships during childhood that represent generalizations from research that has been conducted with adults. Fortunately, advances in child neuropsychological assessment recently have begun to address a number of these erroneous assumptions (Tramontana & Hooper, 1988). There are a number of theoretical issues germane to this distinction that can facilitate an understanding of the dynamic relationships between brain and behavior that occur throughout the life span. In the first section of this chapter, four of the more cogent issues are discussed including functional brain organization, information processing, cerebral hemispheric lateralization, and plasticity. In the second section, discussion will be directed toward the implication of these issues in the neuropsychological assessment of children and adolescents.

Keywords

Cerebral Hemisphere Functional System Neuropsychological Assessment Developmental Dyslexia Clinical Neuropsychology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Morris J. Cohen
    • 1
  • Walter B. Branch
    • 1
  • W. Grant Willis
    • 2
  • Lisa L. Weyandt
    • 2
  • George W. Hynd
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Neurology and PediatricsMedical College of GeorgiaAugustaUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Rhode IslandProvidenceUSA
  3. 3.College of Education, Division for the Education of Exceptional ChildrenUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA

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