Overview, Limitations, and Directions

  • Robert J. McCaffrey
  • Antonio E. Puente
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

There is little doubt that individuals with brain injuries constitute a significant segment of our health care population. Of growing concern is the percentage of these patients who are chronic and unresponsive to rehabilitative efforts. Hence, little question should exist as to the importance of addressing the concerns of this population. Traditionally, behavioral or psychological issues have almost always been considered nonexistent or unimportant in addressing brain injury. Fortunately, this erroneous and incomplete approach has evolved to include behavior and, thus, clinical neuropsychology (Puente, 1989).

Keywords

Panic Disorder Neuropsychological Assessment Specialty Training Clinical Neuropsychology Psychopathological Factor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert J. McCaffrey
    • 1
  • Antonio E. Puente
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyThe University at Albany, State University of New YorkAlbanyUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of North Carolina at WilmingtonWilmingtonUSA

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