The Application of Cognitive Therapy to Patients with Personality Disorders

  • Marsha M. Rothstein
  • T. Michael Vallis
Chapter
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

The demonstrated efficacy of cognitive therapy in the treatment of affective disorders (Hollon & Najavits, 1989; Murphy, Simons, Wetzel, & Lustman, 1984), anxiety disorders (Michelson & Ascher, 1987), eating disorders (Garner & Bemis, 1985; Wilson, 1986), and chronic pain (Turk, Meichenbaum, & Genest, 1983) has done much to legitimize cognitive therapy as a form of psychotherapy. As cognitive therapy has become more widely practiced, the types of patients referred to cognitive therapists have become more diverse. No longer is it true that cognitive therapists function largely in research or specialized treatment units. One of the more challenging issues faced by cognitive therapists is working with patients meeting the criteria for personality disorder (DSM-III-R; American Psychiatric Association, 1987).

Keywords

Personality Disorder Cognitive Therapy Therapeutic Relationship Borderline Personality Disorder Patient Automatic Thought 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marsha M. Rothstein
    • 1
  • T. Michael Vallis
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Independent PracticeDelisle Court Professional CenterTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Departments of Psychology and PsychiatryDalhousie UniversityCanada
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyCamp Hill Medical CenterHalifaxCanada

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