Correlations between Psychometric Measures and Psychophysiological as Well as Experimental Variables in Studies on Extraversion and Neuroticism

  • Manfred Amelang
  • Ulrike Ullwer
Part of the Perspectives on Individual Differences book series (PIDF)

Abstract

Extraversion/Introversion (E/I) and Neuroticism (N) are the two “great” dimensions for the description of individual differences in temperament. Corresponding factors can be found—with varying emphases—in the theoretical systems by Guilford, Cattell, and Eysenck. They also hold a central position in the discussion on the Norman (1963) five-factor-model (Costa & McCrae, 1988; McCrae & Costa, 1987). Several monographs dealing with Extraversion/Introversion and Neuroticism have been published (e. g., Eysenck, 1971, a, b; 1973; Eysenck & Eysenck, 1985; Morris, 1979) and scarcely a textbook fails to devote special sections to it. The reasons for this are the relative invariance in the extraction of these dimensions in factor analyses on the one hand and the fairly high validity of E/I and N test scores in predicting peer ratings for both dimensions on the other hand (e. g., Amelang & Borkenau, 1982; Costa & McCrae, 1988).

Keywords

Pain Tolerance Impulsiveness Scale Extreme Group Behavioral Inhibition System Behavioral Activation System 
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Manfred Amelang
    • 1
  • Ulrike Ullwer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of HeidelbergHeidelbergFederal Republic of Germany

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