RET with Children and Adolescents

  • Michael E. Bernard
  • Marie R. Joyce
Chapter
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

RET has a long history of application, with children and adolescents, to the treatment of a variety of childhood problems including conduct disorders (e. g., DiGiuseppe, 1988), low frustration tolerance (e. g., Knaus, 1983), impulsivity (e. g., Kendall & Fischler, 1983), academic underachievement (e. g., Bard & Fisher, 1983), anxieties, fears and phobias (e. g., Grieger & Boyd, 1983), social isolation (e. g., Halford, 1983), obesity (e. g., Foreyt & Kondo, 1983), depression (e. g., DiGiuseppe, 1986), and childhood sexuality (e. g., Walen & Vanderhorst, 1983). This chapter provides an up-to-date conceptualization of how RET can be used effectively with young clients. The foundation of the present material can be found in Bernard and Joyce, Rational-Emotive Therapy with Children and Adolescents: Theory, Treatment Strategies, Preventative Methods (1984). We have endeavored to refine the ideas presented in this earlier work, incorporating what we have learned over the years since its publication.

Keywords

Emotional Reaction Emotional Problem Young Person Cognitive Therapy Conduct Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael E. Bernard
    • 1
    • 2
  • Marie R. Joyce
    • 3
  1. 1.School of EducationUniversity of MelbourneParkvilleAustralia
  2. 2.Australian Institute for Rational-Emotive TherapyCarltonAustralia
  3. 3.Centre for Family StudiesAustralian Catholic UniversityOakleighAustralia

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