Problems in (Really) Living

Behavioral Approaches to the Elderly’s Goals Regarding Dating, Marriage, and Sex
  • Jane E. Fisher
  • William O’Donohue
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

In recent years behaviorists and behavior therapists have begun studying the behavior and treating the problems of the elderly (Baltes & Barton, 1977; Hussian, 1981; Skinner & Vaughn, 1983). These endeavors give rise to some important questions regarding the assumptions and the goals of what is often called “behavioral gerontology” For example: What can be a proper rationale for a behaviorally oriented clinician or researcher to demarcate a subset of the population (i.e., those over 65 years of age) for special study?; Is this consistent with the behavioral theoretical framework?; Are there any considerations that render the demarcation criterion (advanced chronological age) problematic?

Keywords

Elderly Couple Marital Satisfaction Sexual Problem Scientific Explanation Irrational Belief 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jane E. Fisher
    • 1
  • William O’Donohue
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyNorthern Illinois UniversityDeKalbUSA

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