Mentally Disturbed Patients in Nigeria

Problems and Prospects of Proper Rehabilitation
  • A. I. Odebiyi
  • R. O. Ogedengbe
Part of the Topics in Social Psychiatry book series (TSPS)

Abstract

The problems of mentally disturbed patients in Nigeria can be approached from various dimensions. Most relevant to this chapter is the social reaction to mental illness, which in itself is a function of various factors. These factors include the people’s belief system as it pertains to the causes and prognosis of mental illness; their attitudes toward mental illness and the mentally disturbed; and the role of the government vis-à-vis these problems.

Keywords

Mental Illness Mental Health Care Mental Patient Random Sampling Technique Contact Group 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. I. Odebiyi
    • 1
  • R. O. Ogedengbe
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Sociology and AnthropologyObafemi Awolo UniversityIle-IfeNigeria

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