Teacher and School Personnel Training

  • Mary Margaret Kerr
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

This chapter offers a discussion of issues in training teachers and other school personnel to work with severely behaviorally disordered/mentally retarded students. School personnel may include classroom teachers, par-aprofessionals, preservice or student teachers, school psychologists, and a host of other staff members (e. g., principals, counselors, speech and language specialists). This discussion, however, will be limited to the former group of professionals. The school may refer to a regular public school in which a few self-contained classes for the severely handicapped operate, or a special public, private, or parochial school devoted entirely to the education of the handicapped. A group of classrooms may also be located on the grounds of a public or private residential institution.

Keywords

Special Education Autistic Child School Personnel Applied Behavior Analysis Progress Monitoring 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary Margaret Kerr
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and ClinicUniversity of Pittsburgh School of MedicinePittsburghUSA

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