Homosexuality

  • Stuart Palmer
  • John A. Humphrey

Abstract

As is the case with prostitution, homosexuality is difficult to define dearly. Some researchers distinguish between homosexual behavior and homosexual identity.1 Homosexual behavior refers to erotic physical stimulation between two persons of the same sex. Homosexual identity concerns an individual’s self-conception as a homosexual individual, as one who prefers homosexual relationships although he or she may also engage in heterosexual relationships, or not engage in sexual activity at all.

Keywords

Male Homosexual Female Role Homosexual Behavior Sexual Deviance Male Homosexuality 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stuart Palmer
    • 1
  • John A. Humphrey
    • 2
  1. 1.University of New HampshireDurhamUSA
  2. 2.University of North CarolinaGreensboroUSA

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