The Behavior of Compliance

Communicating Law
  • Joseph F. DiMento
Part of the Environment, Development, and Public Policy book series (EDPE)

Abstract

In a liberal democracy, enforcement by itself, no matter how fully supported and professional, cannot and should not insure compliance with law. Poorly conceptualized, badly drafted, and incompletely articulated regulations counter positive response to environmental goals.

Keywords

Wall Street Journal Mobile Home Reagan Administration Consumer Product Safety Commission Consensus Workshop 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph F. DiMento
    • 1
  1. 1.University of California, IrvineIrvineUSA

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