Smoking

  • Michael Feuerstein
  • Elise E. Labbé
  • Andrzej R. Kuczmierczyk

Abstract

Historically, the development of smoking behavior may be traced back to the fifteenth century; this developmental pathway is summarized in Table 11–1. The increase in recent years in the number of reviews on the theoretical aspects of why people smoke and the effectiveness of current interventions to eliminate as well as to prevent smoking behavior (Frederiksen & Simon, 1979; Hunt & Matarazzo, 1981, Leventhal & Cleary, 1980; Lichtenstein, 1982) reflects the significance of this health risk factor. Given the accumulation of research studies on the effects of cigarette smoking, a strong statement can be made regarding the negative effects of smoking on health, particularly with regard to heart disease, cancer, emphysema, peptic ulcers, and chronic bronchitis (USPHS, 1983). There is also clear evidence that excessive smoking has deleterious health effects on nonsmokers (USPHS, 1975). The presence of smoke in a closed environment can produce a variety of problems for the nonsmoker, ranging from mild irritation to allergic reaction and cardiovascular stress. Smoking during pregnancy significantly increases the likelihood of deleterious effects on the fetus, including stillbirths, higher infant mortality, prematurity, and decreased birth weight (USPHS, 1975). Because of the powerful negative impact of cigarette smoking on health, efforts to achieve a better understanding of smoking behavior and to improve methods of treatment are continually being made. Table 11–2

Keywords

Cigarette Smoking Smoking Cessation Smoking Behavior Behavioral Medicine Smoking Cessation Intervention 
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Feuerstein
    • 1
  • Elise E. Labbé
    • 2
  • Andrzej R. Kuczmierczyk
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Rochester School of Medicine and DentistryRochesterUSA
  2. 2.University of Miami School of MedicineMiamiUSA

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