Adult Literacy Policy in Industrialized Countries

  • Leslie J. Limage

Abstract

The title of this chapter may appear rather provocative to any adult educators presently concerned with adult literacy provision in a number of industrialized countries. The provocation lies in the fact that most developed nations are still at various stages of recognizing that there are indeed millions of people in their populations who are completely illiterate or semi-illiterate, and this in spite of a longstanding formal education system through which virtually all adults have passed.

Keywords

Industrialize Country Migrant Worker Adult Literacy Adult Education Formal Schooling 
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Notes

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leslie J. Limage
    • 1
  1. 1.UNESCOParisFrance

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