Nanocomposites for Coatings and Optics

  • Helmut K. Schmidt

Abstract

The preparation of optical materials has to follow only one important requirement. The materials have to be transparent for the considered wavelength. In oder to obtain this, the phase dimension of these materials has to be considerably below the wavelength of the light to be used in order to avoid Rayleigh scattering. This simple requirement for a long time only could be fulfilled by glasses, single-crystals or some polymers the phase dimension of which is below 30 or 20 nm. With up-coming new technologies for the fabrication of dispersed materials with very small particle or pore sizes, a variety of new materials can be considered to be interesting for optics. One of the candidates are inorganic gels, for example produced by the sol-gel process [1, 2]. Depending on processing techniques, pores in gels can be made small enough to avoid light scattering, and if these pores are filled by components with optical functions, for example, lasing dyes [3], composite materials with high optical transparency and special functions can be produced.

Keywords

Surface Free Energy Methacrylic Acid Titanium Nitride American Ceramic Society Phase Dimension 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    C. J. Brinker and G. W. Scherer. „Sol-Gel Science”, Academic Press Inc., Boston (1990).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    J. McKiernan, J. I. Zink, and B. S. Dunn, SPIE Vol. 1758:381 (1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    R. Reisfeld, in: „Sol-Gel Science and Technology”, M. A. Aegerter, M. Jafelici Jr., D. F. Souza, and E. D. Zanotto, eds., World Scientific Publishing Co. PTE Ltd., Singapore (1989) 322.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    H. Schmidt, J. Non-Cryst. Solids 178:302 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    J. Y. Tseng, C.-Y. Li, T. Takad, C. Lechner, and J. D. Mackenzie, SPIE Vol. 1758:612(1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    M. Mennig, M. Schmitt, U. Becker, G. Jung, and H. Schmidt, SPIE Vol. 2288:130 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    E. Matijevic, in: Ultrastructure Processing of Advanced Ceramics, J. D. Mackenzie and D. R. Ulrich, eds., John Wiley & Sons, New York (1988) 429.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    H. Schmidt, R. Naß, M., Asian, K.-P. Schmitt, T. Benthien, and S. Albayrak, J. de Physique IV, Coll. C7, Vol. 3:1251 (1993).Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    V. Gerhard and S. Krämer, private communication, to be published later.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    H. Krug, N. Merl, and H. Schmidt, in: Teubner-Texte zur Physik, Vol. 27: Integrated Optics and Micro-Optics with Polymers, W. Ehrfeld, G. Wagner, W. Karthe, H.-D. Bauer, and H. G. Moser, eds., B. G. Teubner Verlagsgesellschaft Stuttgart-Berlin (1993) 192.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    R. Naß and H. Schmidt, in: Ceramic Powder Processing Science, H. Hausner, G.L. Messing, S. Hirano, eds., Deutsche Keramische Gesellschaft e.V., Köln (1989) 69.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    G. Rinn and H. Schmidt, in: Ceramic Transactions, Vol. I, Part A: Ceramic Powder Science, American Ceramic Society, Westerville (1988) 23.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    M. Mennig, G. Jonschker, and H. Schmidt, SPIE Vol. 1758:125 (1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    M. Mennig and G. Jonschker, private communication.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    R. Naß, S. Albayrak, M. Asian, and H. Schmidt, in: Ceramic Transactions, Vol. 51: Ceramic Processing Science and Technology, H. Hausner, S. Hirano, and G. L. Messing, eds., American Ceramic Society, Westerville/Ohio (1995) 591.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    H. Gleiter, Progress in Materials Science 33:223 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    D. Burgard, Ch. Kropf, R. Naß, and H. Schmidt, in: Proc. 1994 MRS Spring Meeting, Symposium „Better Ceramics Through Chemistry VI”, San Francisco, Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. (in print).Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    H. Schmidt, J. Sol-Gel Science and Technology 1:217 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    G. Philipp and H. Schmidt, J. Non-Cryst. Solids 63:283 (1984).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    R. Kasemann, H. Schmidt, and E. Wintrich, in: Proc. 1994 MRS Spring Meeting, Symposium „Better Ceramics Through Chemistry VI”, San Francisco, Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. (in print).Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    R. Kasemann and H. Schmidt, oral presentation at „Fluorine in Coatings” Conference, September 1994, Salford, Great Britain.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    H. Schmidt, R. Kasemann, T. Burkhart, G. Wagner, E. Arpac, and E. Geiter, in: ACS Symposium Series on Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Composites, J. E. Mark, P. A. Bianconi, and C. Y.-C. Lee, eds., American Chemical Society, Washington (in print).Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    C. Becker, M. Zahnhausen, H. Krug, and H. Schmidt, in: Extended Abstracts of the Fourth SAAR-LOR-LUX Meeting on Functional Advanced Materials. G. Kugel, ed., CLOES-SUPELEC, Technopole de Metz, November 1994.Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    H. Schmidt, H. Krug, R. Kasemann, and F. Tiefensee, SPIE Vol. 1590:36 (1991).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    H. Schmidt, in: Proceedings NATO ARV on Applications of Organometallic Chemistry in the Preparation and Processing of Advanced Materials, Cap d’Agde/France, September 1994 (in print).Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    H. Schmidt and H. Krug, in: ACS Symposium Series 572 „Inorganic and Organometallic Polymers II: Advanced Materials and Intermediates, P. Wisian-Neilson, H. R. Allcock, K. J. Wynne, eds., American Chemical Society, Washington (1994) 183.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    H. Krug, P. W. Oliveira, and H. Schmidt, in: Ceramic Transactions Volume 55: Sol-Gel Science and Technology, E. Pope, S. Sakka, and L. Klein, eds., American Ceramic Society (in print).Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    P. W. Oliveira, H. Krug, H. Künstle, and H. Schmidt, SPIE Vol. 2288:554 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    M. Mennig, H. Schmidt, and C. Fink, SPIE Vol. 1590:152 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. 30.
    T. Burkhart, M. Mennig, H. Schmidt, and A. Licciulli, in: Proc. 1994 MRS Spring Meeting, Symposium „Better Ceramics Through Chemistry VI”, San Francisco, Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. (in print).Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    M. Mennig, M. Schmitt, B. Kutsch, and H. Schmidt, SPIE Vol. 2288:120 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. 32.
    M. Mennig, U. Becker, M. Schmitt, and H. Schmidt, oral presentation at the American Society Annual Meeting, May 1995, Cincinnati/Ohio.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Helmut K. Schmidt
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für Neue Materialien gem. GmbHSaarbrückenGermany

Personalised recommendations